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Category Archives: Colon Cancer Battle and Survival Stories

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month March 2012

 If more than ½ of the diseases are preventable (diet, lifestyle, testing and early diagnosis), why aren’t we taking action?

First I WAS TOO SCARED: If I only knew signs of irregularity like bright red spots or dark “tarry” stools was a sign of blood in the stool. I didn’t notice the problem until I was literally bleeding with each bowel movement. This went on for quite some time and I was too embarrassed and too scared to go to a doctor.
Then I was TOO SCARED NOT TO SEE A DOCTOR:
The pain was so severe like a piercing knife through my spine I knew something was wrong. My gynecologist said to me the blood was too excessive and was going on for far too long and was certain it was not related to my nerves. He gave me the name of a proctologist to make an appointment for a colonoscopy and that’s how they found the polyp. As a result, my surgery warranted an irreversible colostomy. After enduring 22 radiation treatments only lasting 22 seconds each session, this surgery lead to an ileostomy, due to post-radiation burn and other post-surgery complications.  My doctor told me if I would have only come to him when the symptoms first occurred he could have removed the polyp and we would have avoided all the rest. If only there was a recall button.

 

TAKE ACTION, ask your primary care doctor for a Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT)[v] which can detect or prevent cancer long before the symptoms occur. Make your health a number one priority. You’re worth it and your family and friends are worth it!

If you are age 50 and older the prevent cancer foundation recommends the following screening[iii]:

  • Colonoscopy: Every 10 years
  • Virtual colonoscopy: Every 5 years
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy: Every 5 years
  • Double-contrast barium enema: Every 5 years

Screening intervals for tests that mainly find cancer:

  • Fecal occult blood test (FOBT): Every year
  • Fecal immunochemical test (FIT): Every year
  • Stool DNA test (sDNA): Ask your health care professional

My body had brought me to a point that doing daily activities became too difficult because of the severe pain. I urge you to please take action and control of your health. Regular screenings will greatly increase the early detection of colon polyps which can ultimately SAVE your life!

With love and God’s Blessings,

Dee Dee Email Me: littledeet@yahoo.com E-mail the techie behind the Chat With Dee Dee (Blog, Facebook & Twitter pages)stephanie@gccrepair.com (who happens to be my daughter).

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Let’s help each other figure it out together

Honor and Privilege starts with using the gifts and ones experiences in life to help others.

If the most effective tool in medicine is communication, I believe starting and continuing the conversation about prevention is key. After all, there’s no recall button on cancer.

What an honor and privilege to have the opportunity to speak at the Luke Air Force Base in Glendale, AZ. I’ve been invited today March 7, 2012 to share my colorectal cancer survivor story to raise awareness and educate attendees regarding colorectal cancer and prevention.

I pray that sharing my real-life experience might inspire someone to get screened.

With love and God’s Blessings,

Dee Dee

Email Me: littledeet@yahoo.com

E-mail the techie behind the Chat With Dee Dee (Blog, Facebook & Twitter pages) who happens to be my daughter.

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Living with Lymphedema: How it impacts life and what you can do about it now

Immediate Onset of Symptoms
And like that, about 10 years after my colorectal cancer surgery a new side effect developed. I woke up one morning and my leg was swollen like a balloon. Since it was instantaneous we didn’t even consider it being related to my cancer surgery or radiation at that time. I remember it was summer and I was coming home from a weekend in the mountains. I recall thinking I must have been bitten by a spider, but, when the swelling subsided we thought it had resolved on its own.

M
y 1st Diagnosis
Later that summer we headed down the shore to enjoy time at the beach. It never happened before but something about the sand touching my foot it became immediately irritated and my leg became very red and swollen and achy. We decided to go to the emergency room and they examined me and the first diagnosis I received was cellulites. There is lack of awareness and understanding about secondary lymphedema. I was never educated as a patient that I might experience an immediate onset of symptoms in secondary lymphedema. If I had been informed about the symptoms of the condition I would have been properly diagnosed and treated early on. However, since I wasn’t aware of this side effect it was many years before I started receiving treatment for lymphedema.

Living with Edema
During the early stages my leg was still manageable; when my leg would swell and/or ache I would simply elevate it until the swelling would subside. It never really hindered my mobility in any way during the early years.

I remember my youngest daughter was still in grammar school at that time. I have so many fond memories of that time. I was the President of the home school association and for a number of years I was still very active despite the swelling. It was interesting how it didn’t slow me down. I know God gave me the strength to continue to have the energy and ability run at a time when my daughter was young and needed me. It really warms heart when I think of those times and coming alongside the others in the home school association. Some of the great projects we accomplished as a group were so rewarding. I share these stories to add emphasis on just how active I was during the early onset of lymphedema. As some of you might have realized by now I’m not shy and I don’t mind using a little chutzpah[i] when necessary ([i] chutzpah is a Yiddish word for assertiveness. Every now and again I like to throw in a Yiddish word I learned from my coworkers and customers during my many years as a hair stylist). I was told it was unheard of before my term as President of the home school association, but when I became busy at the school with the number of activities and fundraising events I thought to myself I needed my own office at the school. I chuckle when I think of this memory. So I scouted the school and set-up my H.Q. in one of the vacant offices. I remember the principle being taken aback that I had occupied an office space, but she never did ask me to leave (smile). My team and I had been very involved in fund raising for the school and I know that administration and teachers had truly appreciated our help. We did a variety of events from fashion shows, dinners, tricky trays and we even did a magic show once where the magician released doves off of the stage at the end. Quite a show! These were truly great times and fantastic way to raise money for our non-profit private school. I really believe God gave me those experiences so I would have these skills to later use in my ministry.

For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Jeremiah 29:11 

Years Later I Received the Diagnosis – Lymphedema
By then, as my leg continued to swell and tighten and felt heavier and became achier, I decided to seek another opinion. I finally saw a doctor who took one look at me and said yep you have lymphedema. Honestly I don’t recall what tests he performed at that time but I do remember that I started to get specialized help from that point forward. As a result the new diagnosis, they sent me for specialized physical therapy for lymphedema. This included lymphatic massage, leg wrapping and I was fitted for a compression stocking. My case manager helped me to order my pneumatic compression pump which they also used in therapy so I would have a way to continue with treating my leg on an ongoing basis.   

So What’s Lymphedema Anyway?
I’ll use excerpts from a combination of resources I found to accurately describe what it is and how the lymph system works.

Excerpt from American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), “The lymphatic system collects excess fluid and proteins (lymph) from the body tissues and carries them back to the bloodstream. Lymph is moved slowly through larger and larger lymphatic vessels and passes through small bean-shaped structures called lymph nodes. Edema, or swelling, may occur when there is an increase in the amount of fluid, proteins, and other substances in the body tissues. It’s also known as lymphatic obstruction, is a condition of localized fluid retention and tissue swelling caused by a compromised lymphatic system. – From Wikipedia. Statistics indicate, a conservative estimate, that there may be 1-2 million people in the United States with some form of primary lymphedema and two to three million with secondary lymphedema.

What are the Causes of lymphedema? In cancer patients several leading factors of secondary lymphedema is the result of radiation damage to the lymph nodes and/or the lymph system and/or scar tissue.

What are the symptoms lymphedema?

  1. Unexplained swelling
  2. Unexplained aching
  3. Heaviness in the limb (for me when my leg swells it feels like it’s in a cement block)
  4. Tightness and weakness” 

What Can I Do Now If I’m experiencing These Symptoms?
Unfortunately there is no cure for lymphedema, but it can and should be treated to avoid further complications as early as possible. I didn’t know about the treatment options available at the time I was diagnosed so it’s important to me to share this with others.

The Mayo Clinic gives an outline and explanation of methods used to properly diagnose lymphedema condition. “The doctor will discuss your condition, examine the limb for swelling and redness and measure the limb. Doctors with special expertise in diagnosis and treating lymphedema may perform some of the following tests:

  • Computerized tomography (CT) scans. A CT scan produces a series of X-rays to create a detailed image of your body. Your doctor may use this test to see sections of the lymphatic system that may be blocked (obstructed).
  • Echocardiogram. An echocardiogram uses sound waves (ultrasound) to produce detailed images of your heart and blood vessels. An echocardiogram helps determine the size of your heart, how your heart valves are working and how well your heart is pumping. Your doctor uses the echocardiogram to detect heart or blood vessel problems, including obstructions in blood vessels.
  • Genetic tests. Genetic tests may be performed to test for congenital lymphedema (lymphedema present at birth).
  • Lymphoscintigraphy. In this test, your doctor injects a radionuclide dye under your skin to look at the flow of lymphatic fluid in your limbs. Your doctor scans you with a machine at several time intervals, which shows the dye traveling through your lymphatic system and lymph nodes. This test reveals blockages in your lymphatic system.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI scan uses magnetic fields and radio waves to create detailed images of your body’s tissues. Your doctor may infuse a contrast agent into a vein in your lymphatic system to see your lymphatic system more clearly on the MRI.”

Banner Health lists the following Treatment Options:

  • “Manual lymph drainage massage to release protein molecules from the tissue and move them along with the excess fluid into the lymphatic capillaries and out of the limb with a noninvasive, technical, therapy technique.
  • Compression bandaging of the limb to provide a firm external non-elastic support to tissue, which acts as a counter force to muscle contraction and, thus, promote lymphatic pumping during even the slightest muscle contraction.
  • Comprehensive fitness program, including flexibility, strengthening and aerobic activities to enhance the lymph drainage.
  • Lymphedema education: Review key points for good health while living with lymphedema.
  • Pneumatic Compression Pump A pneumatic compression device such as the lymphedema pump consists of a garment or sleeve that is wrapped around the affected limb, and a pneumatic pump that inflates the sleeve with compressed air. The sleeve is inflated and deflated intermittently at varying intervals and pressures.”

I’m always exploring new ways for managing my Lymphedema treatment. More recently I’ve started using a brace on my ankle to provide better support. Secondary lymphedema can weaken the muscle tone and strength over time and a little support can be helpful. I’m also exploring the C-Boot Elastic.  This is the first mobile intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC). Over the years my mobility has decreased especially in the summer months due to the humidity the swelling increases and the leg becomes heavier and achy. Lymphedema weakens the muscles making it difficult for me to support my body weight especially when the swelling increases. I brought the information to my primary care physician; however, since it is not her area of expertise she wasn’t able to measure me or write a script for the boot. I’ve yet to find a doctor who specializes in treating lymphedema to request help with measurement and ordering the c-boot. The cost is in the upwards of $2K so this is still a work in progress for me.

Another great resource to plug into is The National Lymphedema Network (NLN) http://www.lymphnet.org/, send an e-mail: nln@lymphnet.org  or call their Hotline: 1-800-541-3259. The site offers a variety of resources for both the patient and doctor. You can search for treatment or support groups, find a pen pal, and learn about clinical trials and much more.

My friends please write to me if you are feeling or experiencing something similar.  I’d love to hear from you. I didn’t have anyone who could relate to me at the time and I don’t want that for you.  Please send me an email or reach out to me via Facebook or Twitter.

With love and God’s Blessings,

Dee Dee

Email Me: littledeet@yahoo.com

E-mail the techie behind the Chat With Dee Dee (Blog, Facebook & Twitter pages) who happens to be my daughter.

Disclaimer Chat With Dee Dee

References:

http://www.oncologypt.org/mbrs/factsheets/LymphedemaFactSheetFinal.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lymphedema

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/thesite/Arm_and_Leg_Swelling_After_Cancer.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.org/lymphedema/diagnosis.html

http://www.bannerhealth.com/Locations/Arizona/Banner+Desert+Medical+Center/Programs+and+Services/Rehabilitation/Lymphedema+Treatment.htm


[i] chutzpah a Yiddish word for assertiveness

 

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New Research Developments in gastrointestinal cancers

One of the missions of the Chat With Dee Dee blog is to come alongside other cancer survivors and family members as an outreach to be there for those going through cancer treatment and after care. We also desire to share information and resources from reputable organizations about diganosis, research developments and treatments. The things I share are for informational purposes only not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

New Research Developments 

 

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Your Story: What’s changed your life (milestones, health, spiritual, family)?

Dear Friends,

Once again thank you for stopping by! Today I’m writing to all of you to ask for ‘your stories’. I am so blessed to have this opportunity through the Chat with Dee Dee blog to get to know so many new people and slowly develop acquaintanceship(s) along the way.

When I started my blog in 2010 my first vision was to share my cancer survivor story and things I’ve learned along the way. What I never anticipated was how God would use this blog as a format for others to share their stories and to give me so many opportunities to learn and grow. 

I have had some of the most amazing guest blog posts and as a result I’ve been so fortunate to share a variety of topics with my blog, Facebook and Twitter readers:

As many of you know from corresponding with me or from reading my disclaimer, I’m in the process of writing a book. I’m using ‘my stories’, ‘your stories’ and sharing other helpful information and tools I learn about along the way that impact ‘our lives’.

So now I’m writing to you once again to ask for your inspirational stories. If you’re like many of the people who have written or spoken with me, you’re probably thinking to yourself but I don’t have anything to share. Well your wrong, we all have a story our life experiences though familiar to us are new, inspirational and so very helpful to others.

Write now some of you are experiencing or have experienced a life changing event whether medical, financial, relationship or spiritual it’s your story and it’s so valuable. I get so excited when I am blessed to hear from others and learn about your journey and how you’ve conquered and learned to overcome or live joyfully despite the circumstances life brings our way.

Romans 8:7  No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.

I would be honored to hear from you. It is my desire through my blog and outreach ministry to share my survival story to help others and a great part of my ministry and possibly the most rewarding is meeting others and hearing their story and learning tips and advice from others. I know we can collectively learn and benefit from each other.

Please send me an e-mail and share your story and/or comments or question email: Dee Dee (Click Here).

 

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Maximizing Health Outcomes – Improving Patient-Doctor Communication

This blog post is being authored by me, Dee Dee, and my daughter, Stephanie, also the copy/art editor on the blog. We wanted to help others take a closer look at how to better communicate with your doctor and health professionals during surgery and treatments from the perspective of a patient and family member.

I’m sitting here writing to you trying to recall the initial feelings my family and I faced with the onset of my symptoms that led me to the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. The day we received the news it was so overwhelming. I remember immediately crying and sobbing uncontrollably when my doctor confirmed the diagnosis.  He continued to talk but I don’t remember one word he said. Just about everything was racing through my mind at the time. I thought I would die. My children… how would they handle the news? Finally, I thought I heard a voice saying wait listen to what I’m saying … it was the doctor saying it’s not over its operable. I finally stopped sobbing and started to listen. 

The Patient-Doctor Communication Gap
It’s difficult to pay attention to the details when you’ve been given a serious diagnosis followed by surgery and/or a series of treatments. 

I was recently in a discussion about a loved one who’s going through a tough time between diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. The reality is we don’t plan for a positive result on test for cancer. We don’t foresee a loved one incurring a life altering medical condition so when it hits us we’re almost always unprepared. Battling chronic pain, being given a serious diagnosis, faced with a series of tests, insurance limitations and treatment options can not only be overwhelming but also very frustrating. We have questions but we’re in the hands of our trusted medical professionals. They know best right?

Patient-family member’s role in improving communication
First step is filling the advocate role to close the communication gap. Often the patient is not in a position to take on the added responsibility of documenting symptoms and researching options. For me, my spouse’s involvement in my treatment and aftercare was critical to my healing. There are far too many oversights that can occur when no one is watching. An advocate can be a spouse, family member, friend, health advocate, case manager, etc. The important point is another set of eyes involved in the process.

Verbalizing your questions and concerns[i]
Sometimes we’re afraid or embarrassed to talk about the questions and concerns in our thoughts about post-surgery/post-treatment life. It’s important to verbalize your questions with your doctor(s) to help them better understand the patient and family member’s perspective and enable them to problem solve and give suggestions to help improve quality of care and life.

Record Keeping/Portable Health Records (PHR)/Health Journal
Keeping a record of symptoms, doctor’s visits and treatments is of significant importance.  Many of you, like me, are embarrassed to discuss symptoms with your doctors or you think it’s a normal part of ageing. It is our responsibility to keep track of our health and to ask the doctor the right questions.

You have a right to request copies of MOST of your medical records
There are a few exceptions to the rule but it is always a good idea to request a copy of your medical records to keep in your PHR/Health Journal Binder.

1. How do I request copies of my records?

Write a letter to your doctor including the following (excerpts from about.com “How to Request Your Medical Records”:

  • your name, including your maiden name (if applicable)
  • Social Security number/ID number
  • date of birth
  • address and phone number
  • e-mail address
  • record(s) being requested
  • date(s) of service (months and years under the doctor’s care)
  • signature
  • delivery option (whether you prefer to pick up, fax, e-mail, etc.)
  • make a point to request a copy of your records at each doctor’s visit.
  • note: there may be a per page copy fee charged (e.g., $0.75 a page). If you have financial limitations and cannot afford to pay for copies of your medical records, make a notation in your request letter that ‘I cannot afford to pay’.
  • NOTE: Diagnostic lab test records, for such tests as blood tests, CT scans, x-rays, mammograms or others, should be requested from the doctor who ordered them, or your primary care physician. In most states, the lab will not provide them to you directly.

Time limitations[ii]
Keep in mind a doctor’s schedule is very hectic so be mindful that you will have a small window of time to ask your questions. I suggest writing all of your questions down and then reviewing the list with your case manager/patient advocate to see if any of the questions can be answered by your support team without enlisting the help of your doctor (e.g., insurance questions, assistance with finding in-patient/out-patient acute/sub-acute facility for rehabilitation, sharing internet information about a disease/procedure, etc.). When you meet with your doctor bring two copies of your dated questions list with you so you will both have a copy and be ready to discuss the facts and be sure to have a pen on hand and extra paper to take note of the doctor’s response (this can later be recorded in your Personal Health Records (PHR).

  • Questions about your diagnosis/symptoms (further clarification what it means for quality of life)
  • Questions about medications and doses and any side effects you’ve experienced
  • A food journal and any significant questions you have about how certain foods effect you

If you are feeling or experiencing something similar, I’d love to hear from you. I didn’t have anyone who could relate to me at the time and I don’t want that for you.  Please send me an email or reach out to me via Facebook or Twitter.

With love and God’s Blessings,

Dee Dee

Email Me: littledeet@yahoo.com

E-mail the techie behind the Chat With Dee Dee (Blog, Facebook & Twitter pages) who happens to be my daughter.

Disclaimer Chat With Dee Dee

References

 

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“It’s Your Time”, National Women’s Health Week 2011 is May 8-14

Cancer Survivor Blogger's CALL TO ACTION

Cancer Survivor Blogger's CALL TO ACTION

I’m writing to you today in honor of National Women’s Health Week (Learn more about National Women’s Health Week.).   I’m a Colorectal Cancer Survivor, advocate and inspirational blogger.I love the phrase coined by National Women’s Health Week “It’s Your Time”. I couldn’t agree more now is the BEST time to take care of any tests and lifestyle changes you’ve been meaning to take care of but have been putting off for all the same reasons we all do.

I was diagnosed with Colorectal Cancer almost 24 years ago and at that time I couldn’t find help. Now I’m using my survivor story to advocate for Early Testing and to help others. 

WHY, I started my blog sharing my healthy story for two reasons:

First, To come alongside other cancer survivors and family members as an outreach to be there for those going through cancer treatment and after care. Please visit and share (https://chatwithdeedee.wordpress.com/about/)  my blog with others who may have colorectal cancer or similar.

Second, To bring awareness and advocate for testing and early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. By sharing my health story and life lessons I hope others will be compelled to take action. I hope others can learn from my life experience.

MISSION, A key part of my mission as an advocate is to share resources I discover especially for colorectal cancer survivors, digestive diseases (IBD, Crohn’s Disease) and other health care issues (those with neuropathy, lymphedema) as well as support for cancer survivors and families. It would have been so comforting to have someone come beside me and share with me their journey. To have someone tell me, “I’ve been there – and here’s what I can tell you from my experience.” It started with a polyp, which was cancerous and removed surgically. 

In an earlier post I wrote on the topic of not being able to go back for a do over ‘There’s No recall button on Cancer – Surgery and Radiation Treatments“.

First I WAS TOO SCARED: If I only knew signs of irregularity like bright red spots or dark “tarry” stools was a sign of blood in the stool. I didn’t notice the problem until I was literally bleeding with each bowel movement. This went on for quite some time and I was too embarrassed and too scared to go to a doctor.

Then I was TOO SCARED NOT TO SEE A DOCTOR
: The pain was so severe like a piercing knife through my spine I knew something was wrong. My gynecologist said to me the blood was too excessive and was going on for far too long and was certain it was not related to my nerves. He gave me the name of a proctologist to make an appointment for a colonoscopy and that’s how they found the polyp. As a result, my surgery warranted an irreversible colostomy. After enduring 22 radiation treatments only lasting 22 seconds each session, this surgery lead to an ileostomy, due to post-radiation burn and other post-surgery complications.  My doctor told me if I would have only come to him when the symptoms first occurred he could have removed the polyp and we would have avoided all the rest. If only there was a recall button.

Because Cancer Doesn’t Discriminate I Share My Health Story, Dee Dee from Dee Dee on Vimeo.

By sharing my story I hope to bring further awareness to the importance of early testing and detection by blogging (https://chatwithdeedee.wordpress.com/), social media and fundraising efforts. In my blog, I will cover a number of topics from Colorectal Cancer (previous posts ‘Warning Signs Ignored‘, ‘Cancer Surgery & Radiation Treatments’,  ‘Complications of Radiation Therapy‘, ‘Unexpected Encounters – Power of Love’, ‘Refusing to Quit’ , Sharing Our Story Helps Us Begin to Tackle Some of the Tough Questions Together, Ileostomy Nutrition: What can I eat after my surgery?, Empathy: How We Can Be Better at Listening and Responding and My MISSION to discussing practical tips about dealing with a Colostomy and Ileostomy, Lymphedema, Neuropathy, Hip Surgery, UTI, Fractured Pelvis and much more. I will also share dietary tips despite limitations from a personal, first-hand perspective. I will also touch upon the treatments and medications that have helped me along the way (disclaimer).

I want to encourage women to listen to their bodies. Is your body trying to tell you something?  

  • Are you drinking enough water?  It acts as a softener for the stool helping it to pass. Our bodies need it to stay hydrated, protect our joints and organs.[ii]The amount we need depends on how much you eat, exercise, climate conditions, bowel, weight and height.  About 8-11 glasses for women and 8-15 cups for men according to the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The rest of the liquid intake comes from our food. 
  • What’s your diet saying? I know you’re thinking I have an iron stomach this doesn’t apply. I too had an iron stomach growing up and ate almost anything. I love food and still do to this day. But if you’re eating a lot of white flower (ice cream, pasta, rice, cheese bread, processed foods: chips, cookies, crackers) you may be doing more harm then you realize? You can do it by making a few small changes and eating more fiber (fruits, vegetables, whole grains) it gives your stool the consistency it needs to help keep you regular. About 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil daily can protect you from bowel disease.[iii] The current suggestions are about 20 grams of dietary fiber per day. Another super food you can eat is yogurt (aka Lactobacillus). Yogurt has been noted to decrease growth of tumor cells of the GI tract and improve immunity according to CTCA[i]. Limit the amount of red meats you’re eating and alcohol intake. I know bummer but everything in moderation. If we over eat we’re taxing our bodies and reducing years from our life. And please don’t smoke!
    Did you know?
    Fiber and a healthy diet on a regular schedule daily will play a big role in reducing conditions, namely constipation but also things like heart disease, diabetes, diverticular disease. However, there is still no direct proof indicating fiber will prevent colon cancer.[iv]
  • Are you giving yourself enough of time? Are you always in a rush and holding it in because your too busy or you’re out and don’t want to go in public? I know we’ve all avoided public bathrooms but did you know ignoring the urge to go can result in the following:
    • More constipation
    • Hemorrhoids are often a result of constipation, poor diet, lack of exercise and/or hormonal changes 
    • Avoid straining it can lead to fishers. Not worth it!
  • Get your bodies moving! Exercise is great for your overall health and psyche. It’s also important for good digestion. Only 20-30 minutes a day. Take a walk; jump on your bicycle; dance (do the tarantella); jump rope; skip whatever it is just do it!
  • What medications or OTC’s are you taking? Did you know that a number of prescription drugs and over the counter (OTC) medications can cause constipation? If you are on medications or OTC’s please talk to your doctor and ask if any may be causing constipation. 

Learn more about National Women’s Health Week.

I know that I could have never done it without the Lord, my family, my church family and friends. Alone we are weak, but you are not alone. There, but for God’s grace, go I not only to share my story, but to listen to your stories and questions and help you on and through your journey (e-mail Dee Dee Click Here). I will help to bring awareness to organizations and people in need (like the Osto Group a non-profit offering a hand up to those who do not have insurance for ostomy products) and much more I’m sure.

I know my drive and perseverance to fight was what helped me, thank the Lord. You must make an active choice to fight for your life as I did. I often cry out to the Lord and especially when we are going through a very tough time it’s difficult to pray or think of scriptures, but I would remember and want to share with you that the Lord refuses to quit on us. When we are too weak to pray the Holy Spirit intercedes with God’s will on our behalf (Rom. 8:26-27). That comforts me immensely and I hope that it will comfort you too.

Would you believe that over a year ago I didn’t even know how to turn on a computer! That, too, was another big leap for me, but I did it! So here I am, typing to you, hoping the Lord will use this story to bring you hope. May the Lord equip you and give you hope and strength to live life abundantly beyond your limitations!

With love and God’s Blessings,

Dee Dee
Email Me: littledeet@yahoo.com
E-mail the techie behind the Chat With Dee Dee (Blog, Facebook & Twitter pages)(who happens to be my daughter).

Disclaimer Chat With Dee Dee


References

[i] http://www.carislifesciences.com/media/pdf/CarisDx_Constipation.pdf

[ii] http://nutrition.about.com/od/hydrationwater/a/waterarticle.htm

[iii] http://health.msn.com/health-topics/digestive-health/ibd-and-crohns/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100257714

[i] http://www.cancercenter.com/after-care-services/super-foods.cfm

[iv] http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/fiber-full-story/index.html

[ii] http://ezinearticles.com/?Early-Detection-Yields-High-Survival-Rate-For-Colon-Cancer-Patients&id=608448

[v] http://www.medicinenet.com/fecal_occult_blood_tests/article.htm

 

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